Seminars - NCRE - University of Canterbury - New Zealand

European Union Roundtable Seminar Series Programme

Regular weekly meetings are held throughout the academic year on Fridays at 2.00 pm. Occasional seminars are also held to coincide with European and academic visitors to the University (times may vary).

The regular seminars will allow faculty and students to present their work on Europe and facilitate cross-disciplinary linkages. A major goal of the series is to demonstrate the breadth and depth of European-related research being conducted at the University of Canterbury, while past seminar series programmes are archived and can be accessed below.

Note: Speakers may be subject to change. To receive email notifications of weekly speakers and any changes, please email ncre@canterbury.ac.nz with "Please add me to the Roundtable Seminars List" in the subject line.

Please be aware that normally no seminars are scheduled to take place during study breaks.

2017 Seminars

SEMESTER 1

Wednesday

18 January 2017

Undercroft 101

Public Roundtable Seminar - The EU in a post-Brexit world: the end of Normative Power Europe?

Speakers:

Sir Micheal Leigh (Erskine Fellow, German Marshall Fund)
Prof Richard Whitman (University of Kent, UK)
Prof Paul Bacon (Waseda University, Japan)
Dr Wenwen Shen (Korea Univesity, Korea)
Prof Natthanan Kunnamas (Chulalongkorn University, Thailand)
Prof Bingran Dai (Fudan University, China)
Prof Martin Holland (UC, NZ)
Prof Natalia Chaban (UC, NZ)
Dr Serena Kelly (UC, NZ)

Wednesday

22 February 2017

Undercroft 101

2017 - New Challenges, New Beggings Seminar Series

Speaker: H. E. David Taylor, New Zealand Ambassador to the European Union

Bio: David Taylor was appointed New Zealand Ambassador to the European Union, NATO and Sweden in July 2015. At the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Wellington his roles have included Director of the Australia Division, Americas Division and Asia Division. He has been New Zealand's chief negotiator for climate change and a range of other environment issues. Prior to his appointment in Brussels, David served as Ambassador to Indonesia and to ASEAN. He has also served as New Zealand’s Ambassador to South Korea with accreditation to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, as well as having diplomatic assignments in Kuala Lumpur, Washington DC and Suva. David attended the University of Otago where he graduated with degrees in law and history.

 

Friday,

24 February 2017

Undercroft 101

2017 - New Challenges, New Beggings Seminar Series

Speaker: H. E. Bernard Savage , Eu Ambassador to New Zealand

Bio: Bernard Savage was recently appointed as the EU Ambassador to New Zealand. Previous to this, Mr Savage was the Head of Division for the European External Action Service, where he managed and maintained relations with four Arab Maghreb countries; Algeria, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia. Mr Savage has a Master’s degree in Business Administration and Strategic Planning from the Edinburg Business School.

Friday,

3 March 2017

Undercroft 101

2017 - New Challenges, New Beggings Seminar Series

Speaker: H.E. Gerhard Thiedemann

Title: tbc

Abstract: tbc

Bio: tbc

Friday,

10 March 2017

Undercroft 101

Speakers:            Natalia Chaban, Serena Kelly and Franzisca Doser.

Title: Shifting frames: External and Internal Media Framing of Brexit (case of New Zealand).

Abstract: Britain’s referendum decision to leave the European Union (EU) in June 2016, coupled with Prime Minister May’s emphatic stance that ‘BREXIT means BREXIT’[1] has resulted in political and economic uncertainty, not only in Britain[2] and Europe[3], but also around the world.[4] Whilst the British appear to be concerned mainly with the possible economic ramifications of post-BREXIT Britain, there is a concern on the continent that more EU Member States could opt out of the Union. Further afield, BREXIT has been intricately linked with the rise of US President elect, Donald Trump. Yet, until article 50 is triggered by Theresa May, little is known about the outcomes of the referendum result.

Using an established research methodology, this paper is interested in the New Zealand media’s coverage of BREXIT in three time periods – before the referendum, immediately after and around the US election. This coverage is important for a number of reasons including that New Zealand, a former British colony, suffered an economic, political and identity crisis when Britain joined the then European Economic Community in the 1970s. The British media coverage of the debate often suggested that Britain could re-establish stronger Commonwealth ties after its EU exit.

Differentiating between BREXIT news originating from New Zealand, UK and US news sources, this paper examines the concept of ‘shifting frames’ (Voltolini 2016) in external images of BREXIT.  The paper argues the emergence and codification of new external frames of BREXIT in the context of Trump’s election vis-à-vis frames appearing before and immediately after the “Leave” Vote. With news media conceptualised as a “frame entrepreneur” (Voltolini 2016), we hypothesize a different content and dynamic of BREXIT frames in the EU-specific publications (The EUobserver, in our case, monitored in the same three periods). The difference between external and internal to Europe framing of BREXIT is discussed as a challenge for the future EU-New Zealand dialogue.

Bio:

Professor Natalia Chaban is a Jean Monnet Chair, NCRE Deputy Director and Head of European and European Union Studies at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. A leading expert on EU external perceptions, Professor Chaban is a Member of NZ EU Centres Network Board. UC Teaching Award recipient (2006) and Leader of the Jean Monnet Modules, she teaches and designs a variety of under- and post-graduate courses and supervises Masters and PhD students in EU Studies. Professor Chaban has significant experience in analysing EU external perceptions, widely publishing (including articles in the Journal of Common Market Studies, Journal of European Integration, Comparative European Politics, Foreign Policy Analysis, Cooperation and Conflict) and advancing methodological training in this regard. Since 2002, she has led a comparative transnational project on EU external perceptions comprising a multicultural team from 31 countries and 8 EU locations. Her contribution to the field of EU external perceptions has been recognised by scholars in the field of EU international identity and public diplomacy, and research design has been replicated around the world.


Dr Serena Kelly is an early career academic who is passionate about both teaching and researching the politics and external relations of the European Union. Dr Kelly has published extensively on EU external relations both individually and with colleagues in international peer reviewed journals.  Dr Kelly’s PhD was the first in-depth study to explore the potential impact of the EU’s post-Lisbon European External Action Service and the thesis was well received. This research interest has informed her post-doctoral research activities. Since completing her PhD, Dr Kelly has worked on a number of interdisciplinary and international projects, most notably making a key contribution to the NCRE’s flagship Perceptions of the EU project in 10 ASEM countries. In this project she was coordinator, trainer and mentor for approximately 12 postdoctoral and postgraduate researchers as well as their local supervisors. Dr Kelly regularly travels to Europe and Asia to engage with colleagues, conduct fieldwork and present her work at conferences. In addition to her extensive research activity, Dr Kelly has designed and co-taught 9 courses on the politics and policies of the EU since 2008 and enjoys supervising students at all levels. Dr Kelly’s Research Expertise includes: European diplomacy, international political communication and Europe’s relations, presence, impact in and, with the Asia Pacific, especially Australia and New Zealand.


Franzisca Doser is an MEuro student with the NCRE and has worked extensively over the summer period on this project. Franzisca has spent time living in Germany, Singapore as well as New Zealand and these experiences have given her an excellent insight into multiculturalism, integration, education, local media and intercultural communication.

[1] http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36782922.

[2] https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/dec/28/majority-of-managers-think-brexit-uncertainty-will-affect-uk-economy.

[3] http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-37210138.

[4] http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/06/brexit-change-europe-britain-us-politics-213990.


Friday,
17 March 2017

Undercroft 101

 

Speaker: Prof Ben O’Loughlin                                                 

Bio: Ben O’Loughlin is a Professor of International Relations and Co-Director of the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London. He completed his doctorate at the University of Oxford in 2005. Ben is an expert in international political communication. He has completed a number of projects explaining how power and influence operate in relations between media, policymakers and publics.

Friday,
24 March 2017

Undercroft 101

Speaker:              Connor Pokoati

Title:                     Normative Power vs. Market Power – examining the European Union’s ability to influence within Partner Third Countries – Indonesia and Malaysia

                                                                       
Biography:   
Connor Pokoati was born and raised in Christchurch. He began studies at UC in 2011 and was a part of the Adelaide exchange programme after the Feb 2011 earthquake. Connor completed his Undergraduate double major in Political Science and Europe and European Union studies in 2014, and then graduated BA (Hons) with First Class in European Union Studies in 2015. Currently, he is a Masters Candidate at the National Centre for Research from March 2016, and also Interned at the European Union Delegation to Wellington from September to December 2016.


Abstract:
“Normative Power Europe” (Manners, 2002) has become integral in the EU’s image as a global player. The exportation of European norms and values have become common place in economic, social and political agreements between the EU and external partners. In light of the EU’s attempt to become recognised as a global power, another term “Market Power Europe” (Damro, 2012) was coined to demonstrate the EU’s immense economic might in relations with external partners. Examining these two narratives appearance within partner third countries, in the face of current EU domestic issues (BREXIT, the Migration Crisis and the Eurozone crisis), is paramount in understanding the EU’s role and position in the evolving global order. This research attempts to examine how these narratives are received and evaluated in the face of these current EU issues and also evaluated against historical and cultural filters within two former colonies in the emerging region of Southeast Asia, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Friday,
31 March 2017

Undercroft 101

Speaker:              H E Fabrizio Marcelli, Italian Ambassador to New Zealand  

Title:                     EU irregular migration and the rise of populism, an Italian perspective

                                                                   
Biography:   
Fabrizio Marcelli was born in Rome, Italy, on February 25, 1961, he holds a law degree from the University of Rome and served as Lieutenant in the Army. His appointments in the Foreign Service are the following:
in 1991 Mr. Marcelli was appointed Second Secretary for Trade at the Italian Embassy in Antananarivo, Madagascar.
He became Consul of Italy in Mar del Plata, Argentina in 1995 and in Cologne, Germany in 1999.
In 2000 he returned to Rome to serve in the Weapons Export Authorizing Unit of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA). Subsequently he was appointed Counselor at the Division for the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Countries, and specifically at the Libyan Desk.
In 2007 Mr. Marcelli was posted as First Counselor at the Italian Embassy in Buenos Aires.
In April 2008 he was appointed Italian Consul General in San Francisco (USA).
From June 2012 to June 2014 he was Head of the Human Rights Unit at the Italian MFA.

He was appointed Italian Ambassador to Somalia on June 3rd 2014. On September 19th 2016 he took up his current appointment as Italian Ambassador-designate to New Zealand. He speaks English, German, French and Spanish. He is married and has two sons.

Friday,
19 May 2017

Solidarnosc Room

Logie 104

Speaker:              Daviti Mtchedlishvili                                                           

Biography:

Daviti Mtchedlishvili is a PhD candidate at the NCRE, University of Canterbury. His thesis looks at Europeanization Process in the South Caucasus. Daviti holds MA and BA degrees in International Relations and Politics from Lithuania(VMU), the Czech Republic(MU) and Georgia(TSU). He has worked for Centre for European Perspective in Slovenia and is an author of the book "Europeanisation Process in Georgia during the period from 2003 to 2014".  

Abstract:

The aim of my PhD thesis is to look for anomalies of Europeanisation in the South Caucasus. The research will quantify three theoretical explanatory paths of domestic change regarding Europeanization in order to elucidate particular aspects of Europeanisation, respectively, Rationalist & Constructivist, Functionalist & Institutionalist and Political & Economy by incorporating from Mill's System of logic - the method of difference (Most–Similar Cases method) with two essential respect – the casual variables of interest and outcome as far as the Europeanisation process in the South Caucasus is presented as trichotomy, respectively with all possible scenarios. Thus, only Georgia has agreed to a comprehensive engagement and signed the Association Agreement (AAs) and Deep and Comprehensive free Trade Agreement (DCFTAs) with the EU on 27 June 2014 in Vilnius. Armenia and Azerbaijan were invited to sign the agreements, but during the negotiations turned their backs on the EU: Armenia joined the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU) on 9 October 2014, a counterpart to the EU under Russia’s umbrella, while Azerbaijan preferred to remain detached. In particular the thesis will examine the most evident domestic agents & actors, market structures and Idiosyncrasy during the Europeanisation process in the South Caucasus, where the conditionality stimulus – membership – is missing from the picture.

 

SEMESTER 2

Friday,

21 July 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

Speaker:              Bridgette McLellan                                                           

Biography:
Bridgette began her tertiary education at Victoria University of Wellington, graduating with an LLB/ BA in 2014. After completing her Professional Legal Studies, Bridgette followed her interest in Europe to the NCRE and completed a BA (Hons) with First Class in European Union Studies in 2015. Bridgette is currently a Candidate for a Master of Laws at UC, and has recently returned from Europe after undertaking an internship at the European Parliament from September to December 2016.

Abstract:
Each year the European Union Centres Network, in conjunction with the New Zealand Embassy in Brussels and Members of the European Parliament’s Delegation responsible for relations with Australia and New Zealand, offers the opportunity for up to two post-graduate students to work as interns at the European Parliament. Bridgette McLellan was one of the two students selected for the MEP Internship in 2016. In this presentation Bridgette shares her experience of working as an MEP intern in Brussels, and provides practical and useful tips for future interns.

Friday,

28 July 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

4 August 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

11 August 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

18 August 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

25 August 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

15 September 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

22 September 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

29 September 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

6 October 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

13 October 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc
Friday,

20 October 2017

Solidarnosc Room,

Logie 104

tbc

Details of Past Seminars

2016 Semester 1 Semester 2
2015 Semester 1  
2013 Semester 1  
2012 Semester 1 Semester 2
2011 Semester 1 Semester 2
2010 Semester 1 Semester 2
2009 Semester 1 Semester 2 Term 3  
2008 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
2007 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
2006 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
2005 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
2004 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
2003 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
2002 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
2001 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
2000 Term 1 Term 2   Term 4
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